Master Pho at CAFAM

Master Pho at CAFAM

Having seen the extraordinary show, “Shadow of the Turning“, at the Craft and Folk Art Museum of Los Angeles, we wanted to return the following Sunday, to see master crafts-person and artist Binh Pho wind up the show with a demonstration of his work techniques.

Shadow of the Turning” is also the name of a book, an integral part of the show, written by Pho in  collaboration with writer, curator and  director of the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts in Ojai, CA, Kevin Wallace.

WEB1Pho uses, as I understand it, a dental drill,  to create a delicate lace of designs in this ultra-thin wood bowls he turns.

WEB2He demonstrated his techniques from 1-5pm, in the long courtyard outside of the Museum, attended by dedicated band of fascinated onlookers.

WEB3Pho jokingly explained that should he make a “mistake”, such as making an unplanned cut or shape or edge, he could incorporate it into the design later.  His humor is warm, engaging and infectious, and seems a bit “Zen“.

WEB5He applies a sticky film called “frisket” to the surface of the bowl, through which he cuts designs to create a stencil.

WEB6He then airbrushed color through the stencil design onto the wood surface, using acrylic paints…Golden Acrylics, in this case.

WEB4He worked at a table, outside, in December (LA weather not withstanding) surrounded by his myriad tools and materials, seeming completely at ease, stopping only to crack a little joke, or share a humorous anecdote with the crowd.

WEB7He is based in Illinois, and teaches at, “places like Anderson Ranch.” How lucky we were to have him share  his marvelously imaginative and intricate work with us in person, in conjunction with his show.

Possibly a once in a lifetime experience. (Which seems to happen a fair amount in Los Angeles.) Gratitudes to the CAFAM for making this all possible.

May 2016 be a year of magical possibilities and transformation.  Binh Pho does it his way…we can do it ours.

Advertisements

An Amble Around the Gamble

An Amble Around the Gamble


The architectural brethren team of Greene and Greene, created (with the expertise of many) The Gamble  House, a  magnificent Arts and Crafts masterpiece in Pasadena, Ca,  It is also  a National Historic Landmark and museum.  The Greenes designed the house in 1908, for the Gamble family, of Proctor and Gamble fame.

Hallmarks of the  Arts and Crafts Movement in American Craftsman style architecture include the use of natural materials, attention to detail, aesthetics, and craftsmanship.

The Greenes, brothers Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene, were influenced by  traditional Japanese aesthetics, though they never, as we were told, visited Japan.   Outdoor  and indoor space were considered of equal importance in the design, as the Greenes used nature as a guide.

Relief and shelter from the hot sun of Southern California climes were created through wide, overhanging eaves.

The use of wood seems to be celebrated through the design, as well as the juxtaposition of textures, earthy, natural colors, and the finishes and hues of stone, metals, glass and patina, all reflecting the expression and experience of nature, the passing of time, and even planned imperfections,  which were part of the architectural and design philosophy.

Exterior porches  such as the one below are found off three of the second-floor bedrooms and were used for sleeping or entertaining. This one was used by the sons of David and Mary Gamble, as told to us by our amiable  and hardworking guide, who was entrusted with taking us through the entire first floor, and front exterior of the house in 20 minutes!  I think she stretched it to 1/2 hour, but she did it!

We will continue our “Amble Around the Gamble” series in the next post, with a focus  on some of  the wondrous exterior details of The Gamble House.  Hopefully, with a longer time next in Pasadena, I will be able to celebrate the interior of the house, right here on “Artissima, blog of ArtiFactory Studio. Ciao for now!

Have You ever visited The Gamble House, seen the work of Greene and Greene, or other Arts and Crafts buildings?

If so, please share about it with us here.  We love to hear from You.

Remember, we are all ambling and gambling our way through this thing called Life, together.  Happy Trails!

Niki, Too

Niki, Too

Poet and Muse

Mosaic sculpture by Niki de St. Phalle., near the entrance to the Mingei International Museum, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA

Who is the Poet, and Who is the Muse? Does the Poet hold up the Muse, or vica versa?  Both are monumental, in Niki’s eyes.

“My feet’s too big….” Not in Niki’s eyes, or hands. Certainly not in her soul.

Nikigator

Mosaic sculpture by Niki de St. Phalle., also adjacent to the  Mingei International Museum in San Diego’s Balboa Park.

The elaborate, fantastical “Nikigator” provides fun and fantasy for the young at heart. thrilling their imaginations.

Who needs a playground, when you have a Nikigator?

Too friendly to be ferocious? OR, Too ferocious to be friendly?  An easy or uneasy balance between the two?

The Nikigator is encrusted with brilliant “Niki “gems”…

…wild and fantastical designs and patterns that adorn her extravagant creatures…

And delight our souls.

What is your response to “Niki”?

If you feel so inspired, please share it with us here.  We love to hear from you.

Remember, we are all creating this thing called Life, together.

Here’s to Imagination…Creativity…DeLight….
Listen “Charlotte Talks“…all about Nikki…her daughter and granddaughter share about this wondrous being… and .prepare to be inspired!